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Welcome to our blog. Here you’ll find contributions from local historians and experts on the subject of Staffordshire’s involvement in the Great War, and on the commemorative events taking place throughout the County.

Staffordshire Weekly Sentinel Great War Reports

Following the end of the Great War, reports, celebrations, and local War Memorials were planned, instigated, dedicated, and unveiled in North Staffordshire and district, and were reported in the Staffordshire Weekly Sentinel of the period. Ken Ray and Ken Badderley have searched through all the Staffordshire Weekly Sentinel’s from late November 1918 to Spring 1923…

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Florence Colliery Miner Won VC at Passchendaele

Ernest Albert Egerton VC Born 10th Nov. 1897 Died 14th Feb. 1966 World War I Victoria Cross Recipient, born in Longton, Staffordshire, he was educated in local grade schools and began working in a colliery at the age of 16 as a haulage hand. He enlisted in the 3rd North Staffordshire Regiment on his 18th…

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1917 Butter Dish

Amongst the collections of the Imperial War Museum sits a butter dish created by Staffordshire women on the Home Front.

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Staffordshire Soldiers and Passchendaele

Amongst the infantry taking part in the bloody battle of Passchendaele in the First World War were the South Staffs and the North Staffs Regiments. November 8th marks the anniversary of the end of the battle. Paul Morris tells the story… November 8th 2017 marks the 90th anniversary of the conclusion to the battle of…

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Freda: The respected and admired NZRB regimental mascot

In late September 1917, prior to its move from Tidworth Pennings near Salisbury to Brocton Camp on Cannock Chase in Staffordshire, the 3rd New Zealand Rifle Brigade was reviewed by its founder, The Duke of Connaught (King George V’s uncle). His visit was reported in the Chronicles of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force; the article…

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Cavalry and the Bakery on the Chase

When the two World War I army camps were set up on the high, open heathland of Cannock Chase, they were each able to accommodate 20,000 troops. There successive intakes, mainly of recruits, underwent training before being posted to the Western Front. By the time hostilities had ended on 11th November 1918, it is estimated…

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News Archives

  • History group in search for First World War soldier’s family as headstone is reinstalled
  • Staffordshire Weekly Sentinel Great War Reports
  • Florence Colliery Miner Won VC at Passchendaele
  • 1917 Butter Dish
  • Staffordshire Soldiers and Passchendaele
  • Chapel Chorlton Memorial Bench
  • Refugee Tales : viewing the Belgian refugee crisis of WW1 through the lens of contemporary experience
  • Nicholson War Memorial
  • Freda: The respected and admired NZRB regimental mascot
  • Cavalry and the Bakery on the Chase